Advancing Quality NHS Advancing Quality Alliance

Sepsis

Sepsis┬ácan be triggered by an infection in any part of the body. The most common sites of infection leading to sepsis are the lungs, urinary tract, abdomen (tummy) and pelvis. Sepsis may develop when a patient is already in hospital, for example if they have recently had surgery, had a urinary catheter fitted or have had to stay in hospital for a long period of time.’

NHS Choices

Through research, clinical input and clinical guidelines Advancing Quality has developed nine measures that, when applied at the appropriate time, can greatly increase the outcomes for patients. Advancing Quality uses these measures to monitor the quality of care given to patients across the North West with the aim of improving standards and reducing variation in care.

Sepsis was launched in September 2014. Participating trusts had a three month data collection period to ensure their systems were accurately recording the care patients received. Sepsis became part of the AQ conditions in December 2014.

Data for your local hospital will be available by February 2016.


Measures

1. Early warning score calculated and recorded within 60 minutes of hospital arrival

An assessment and recording of the severity of your condition ensures any delays in care are reduced.

2. Screening for Sepsis within two hours of hospital arrival

Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) is how clinical staff will screen you for Sepsis. If you meet two or more criteria of the SIRS this should be documented along with the suspected source of your Sepsis within two hours of hospital arrival.

3. Blood tests should be done within three hours of arrival at hospital

Having your blood tests carried out prior to receiving antibiotics and within three hours of hospital arrival can reduce mortality due to Sepsis.

4. Antibiotics should be given within three hours of hospital arrival

You should be given antibiotics within three hours; starting antibiotic therapy reduced the risk of mortality.

5. Tests for levels of lactic acid in blood done within three hours of hospital arrival

Lactic acid in the blood is detected by testing for serum lactate. High levels of lactic acid can be linked to a lack of blood flow to your organs. It aids clinical staff in diagnosing the severity of your Sepsis.

6. Second litre of IV fluids commenced within four hours of hospital arrival

Receiving intravenous (IV) fluids is an important intervention you should receive in the treatment of you Sepsis. It assists in restoring the blood flow to your organs.

7. Oxygen therapy administered within four hours of hospital arrival

If your blood oxygen levels are low you should receive oxygen therapy within four hours of hospital arrival. Receiving supplementary oxygen ensures the tissues in your organs are receiving enough oxygen.

8. Fluid Balance Chart started within four hours of hospital arrival

If you have received IV fluids an IV fluid chart should have been commenced within four hours of your arrival at hospital. Accurate monitoring of your fluid intake and output is essential in managing your Sepsis.

9. Review by senior clinician or critical care team within four hours of hospital arrival

If you have a high level of serum lactate you should be reviewed by s senior clinician or have an assessment by the critical care team within four hours of hospital arrival.

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